The Divisive Legacy of an Urban Freeway in Austin, Texas

Groups such as the Austin Latino Coalition argue that while the Black and Latino residents east of I-35 are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, they’re not being prioritized to receive the vaccine. Locating the majority of vaccine providers to the west of I-35 (figure 1) represents a burden to the east-side residents who may rely on transit in this city—considered the most car-dependent in Texas.

Major roads undercut safety benefits of highly accessible places

In working with transportation agencies across the U.S., our team often faces questions about the role of safety in accessibility analysis. While we know the safety and comfort of streets clearly impacts access for people on foot or bicycle, the effects of accessibility on overall safety haven’t been clear. Fortunately, leading experts in both accessibility and traffic safety recently teamed up to answer this question.

In the midst of nationwide transit service cuts, more than one million rural households do not have a car

Many transit agencies have been forced to drastically scale back services due to rapidly declining revenues, and rural providers are no exception. Many were already operating on incredibly tight budgets, serving large geographic areas with a small staff of part-time drivers. While it is easy to see how pandemic-related service cuts will impact people in urban areas who rely on transit, the impacts will likely be just as devastating for many rural communities, especially the pockets of rural America with disproportionately low car ownership.