Public Bikesharing in North America During a Period of Rapid Expansion: Understanding Business Models, Industry Trends, and User Impacts (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2014)

This study evaluates public bikesharing in North America, reviewing the change in travel behavior exhibited by members of different programs in the context of their business models and operational environment. This research, featuers interviews with IT-based bikesharing organizations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, as well as both annual members and casual users of the bikesharing systems.

Access Across America: Transit 2014

Researchers at the University of Minnesota released a new report ranking major metropolitan areas in terms of their accessibility to jobs by transit. The report complements the group’s 2013 release, which measured job accessibility by automobile, and builds upon their ongoing efforts to develop tools for assessing transportation performance in terms other than mobility and congestion. Rankings were determined by a weighted average of accessibility, giving a higher weight to closer jobs. The calculations include all components of a transit journey, including “last mile” access and egress walking segments and transfers.

Performance Measures for Nonmotorized Transportation (SSTI, 2014)

At the May 2013 SSTI Community of Practice, participants requested guidance on performance measures for biking and walking projects. After surveying state DOTs, city and MPO staff, national organizations, and the research literature, this draft report outlines strategies used to assess the success of state and local projects.

Recommended Bicycle Lane Widths for Various Roadway Characteristics (NCHRP, 2014)

This report presents recommendations for bicycle lane widths for various roadway and traffic characteristics, including traffic volume, vehicle mix (i.e., percent trucks), lane width and/or total roadway width, and presence/absence of on-street parking. It examines narrow and wide un-protected bike lanes as well as lanes protected with barriers. The report provides guidance on the safety of each lane option for bicyclists.

Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities, 2014)

This report presents finding from research evaluating U.S. protected bicycle lanes (cycle tracks) in terms of their use, perception, benefits, and impacts. It finds that separated bike lanes both encourage new cyclists to ride and make motorists feel that cyclists were safer and more predictable.

Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America’s Largest Metros (George Washington School of Business, 2014)

This report, issued by the George Washington University Business School, examines the growing preference for walkable urbanism and what that means for infrastructure, economic development, housing, etc. The authors rank the 30 largest metros on walkable urbanism, identifying a future demand for tens of millions of square feet of walkable urban development. This demand would provide an economic foundation for the U.S. economy, similar to the building of drivable suburbs in the mid to late 20th century.

Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities, 2014)

This report presents finding from research evaluating U.S. protected bicycle lanes (cycle tracks) in terms of their use, perception, benefits, and impacts. Behavior of bicyclists, motorists, and pedestrians was assessed to determine how well each users understands the facility and to identify potential conflicts. Residents and bicyclists indicated that any type of buffer shows a considerable increase in self-reported comfort levels over a striped bike lane, and support for protected bike lanes was high among all users.

Statewide Transportation Planning for Healthy Communities (Volpe Center, 2014)

This report, the second in a series from FHWA, presents insights and a flexible model for state DOTs that choose to integrate public health considerations into their transportation planning and decision-making. It draws from five case studies of innovative DOTs and their partners, and builds on the project team’s previous white paper.

Lifting the Veil on Bicycle & Pedestrian Spending (Advocacy Advance, 2014)

This report benchmarked planned bicycling and walking project spending in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program and breaks down how state Departments of Transportation can become more transparent and responsive to community needs. Both stand-alone bicycle-pedestrian projects and also road projects that have a bicycle-pedestrian accommodation or component were included.