Perceptions of Bicycle-Friendly Policy Impacts on Accessibility to Transit Services: The First and Last Mile Bridge (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2014)

The coordination of bicycle and transit mode has been presumed to enlarge the transit catchment area, however, geographic changes in the size of catchment areas have not been effectively documented. This research concludes that transit catchment areas are complex for those that integrate the two modes, and policy-makers may wish the further strengthen bicycle-transit integration through the implementation of a set of proactive measures.

Statewide Pedestrian Master Plan (Hawaii Department of Transportation, 2013)

HDOT’s Pedestrian Master Plan provides a comprehensive approach to improving pedestrian safety, evaluates ways to enhance mobility for pedestrians, and helps build a more multi-modal transportation system across Hawaii. HDOT’s plan also prioritizes various pedestrian projects for improvement, identifies and promotes the Complete Streets vision for Hawaii, and meets federal requirements for multimodal planning.

The Bike-share Planning Guide (ITDP, 2013)

Cities around the world are developing bike sharing programs. This guide evaluates international best practice in bike-share, helps to bridge the divide between developing and developed countries’ experiences to provide guidance on planning and implementing a successful bike-share system regardless of the location, size, or density of your city. Amid the droves of information on history, bike share’s benefits, business models, planning, implementation, and best practices, the document answers two important questions. First, what makes a bike share program “world-class”? Second, what programs are “world class”?

America’s Rails with Trails: A Resource for Planners, Agencies, and Advocates on Trails Along Active Railroad Corridors (Rails to Trails Conservancy, 2013)

Instead of converting former rail lines to multi-use trails, states and municipalities are also finding that trails can be built alongside active rail lines. This report examines the characteristics of 88 rails-with-trails in 33 states, based on a survey of trail managers and the results of ongoing study over the past 20 years.

Getting the Goods Without the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts (SSTI, 2013)

This project, funded by SSTI with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE), identifies and evaluates strategies to reduce the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas by managing freight transportation demand.

Tools for Estimating VMT Reductions from Built Environment Changes (Anne Vernez Moudon and Orion Stewart , University of Washington, 2013)

This report reviews the built environment characteristics associated with travel and the tools available that utilize these built environment characteristics to estimate travel and related outcomes such as vehicle emissions and health co-benefits. Tools ranged from simple to complex, and a number of factors should be considered when applying a tool to a planning effort.

Getting on Board for Health (Alameda County Public Health Department, 2013)

This health impact assessment informed the development of the San Francisco Bay Area’s Regional Transportation Plan. It focused specifically on transit-dependent populations and the expected health outcomes that may result from changes to bus access as determined by RTP.

How to Increase Bicycling for Daily Travel (Active Living Research, 2013)

What are the most effective strategies cities can use to increase bicycling? This brief summarizes the available evidence about strategies for increasing bicycling levels and encouraging bicycling as a mode of transportation. It also presents related policy implications.

Our Built and Natural Environments: A Technical Review of the Interactions Among Land Use, Transportation, and Environmental Quality (EPA, 2013)

The EPA’s Office of Sustainable Communities Smart Growth Program offers this comprehensive review on how the built environment – the way we build our cities and towns – directly affects our environment and public health. It provides evidence that certain kinds of land use and transportation strategies – where and how we build our communities – can reduce the environmental and human health impacts of development.