Community Design and the Incidence of Crashes Involving Pedestrians and Motorists Aged 75 and Older (Texas Transportation Institute, 2012)

Community design and transportation infrastructure can be problematic for both younger and older community residents. This study examines how community design specifically affects drivers and pedestrians aged 75 and older.

Walk this Way: The Economic Promise of Walkable Places in Metropolitan Washington, D.C. (Brookings, 2012)

An economic analysis of a sample of neighborhoods in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area using walkability measures, this study offer useful insights for a diverse set of interests, including lenders, developers, economic planning professionals, as well as those interested in the economic healthy of cities.

Land Use and Traffic Congestion (AZ Department of Transportation Research Center, 2012)

A first-ever analysis of land-use and transportation demand in Arizona contradicts fears that compact, “smart growth” development, while beneficial in moderating demand, will increase localized congestion. The report, produced for Arizona DOT in March, also suggests that traditional travel demand modeling is outmoded, unable to reflect land use effects on demand, and it disputes notions that compact development is inequitable and costly.

The Shifting Nature of U.S. Housing Demand (The Demand Institute, 2012)

The Demand Institute believes that a housing market recovery has begun, but this recovery will be different from previous ones because of new market conditions and expectations. These differences may impact transportation planning as commuting and non-work travel patterns change.

Reducing Costs in Kansas through Transportation Efficient School Siting (SSTI, 2012)

This report was produced by SSTI at the request of the Kansas Department of Transportation in order to better understand the implications of school site selection, particularly transportation-related costs, and how to improve the site selection process in Kansas. It provides a series of recommendations for improving the school site selection process in Kansas with a focus on increasing understanding and coordination between school districts and other levels of government that may be impacted by their decisions.

Reducing Costs in Kansas through Transportation Efficient School Siting (SSTI, 2012)

This report was produced by SSTI at the request of the Kansas Department of Transportation in order to better understand the implications of school site selection, particularly transportation-related costs, and how to improve the site selection process in Kansas. It provides a series of recommendations for improving the school site selection process in Kansas with a focus on increasing understanding and coordination between school districts and other levels of government that may be impacted by their decisions.

The BRT Standard (Institute for Transportation & Development Policy, 2012)

The BRT Standard is an effort by leading technical experts to come to a common understanding of what constitutes internationally recognized best practice in Bus Rapid Transit system design. The best BRT systems are ones that combine efficiency and sustainability with passenger comfort and convenience.