Lifting the Veil on Bicycle & Pedestrian Spending (Advocacy Advance, 2014)

This report benchmarked planned bicycling and walking project spending in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program and breaks down how state Departments of Transportation can become more transparent and responsive to community needs. Both stand-alone bicycle-pedestrian projects and also road projects that have a bicycle-pedestrian accommodation or component were included.

Civil rights guidance and equity analysis methods for regional transportation plans: a critical review of literature and practice (Journal of Transportation Geography, 2013)

In this critical review, the authors examine the law, regulatory guidance, academic research, and agency practice pertinent to equity analysis of MPO regional transportation plans. They find that equity recommendations are extensive but generally lack specificity and are rarely enforceable. The current methodology is not appropriate for the analysis of transportation investment benefits. Newer travel demand modeling paradigms are capable of sidestepping methodological problems, and legacy models can be adapted and improved.

Philadelphia Complete Streets Design Handbook (Philadelphia Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities, 2013)

The Philadelphia Complete Streets Design Handbook has ideas to make local streets accommodate all users. It includes checklists at the end for different components of the street. The city intends to update it as comments come in and the document is used by planners and city staff.

Perceptions of Bicycle-Friendly Policy Impacts on Accessibility to Transit Services: The First and Last Mile Bridge (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2014)

The coordination of bicycle and transit mode has been presumed to enlarge the transit catchment area, however, geographic changes in the size of catchment areas have not been effectively documented. This research concludes that transit catchment areas are complex for those that integrate the two modes, and policy-makers may wish the further strengthen bicycle-transit integration through the implementation of a set of proactive measures.

Perceptions of Bicycle-Friendly Policy Impacts on Accessibility to Transit Services: The First and Last Mile Bridge (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2014)

The coordination of bicycle and transit mode has been presumed to enlarge the transit catchment area, however, geographic changes in the size of catchment areas have not been effectively documented. This research concludes that transit catchment areas are complex for those that integrate the two modes, and policy-makers may wish the further strengthen bicycle-transit integration through the implementation of a set of proactive measures.

Statewide Pedestrian Master Plan (Hawaii Department of Transportation, 2013)

HDOT’s Pedestrian Master Plan provides a comprehensive approach to improving pedestrian safety, evaluates ways to enhance mobility for pedestrians, and helps build a more multi-modal transportation system across Hawaii. HDOT’s plan also prioritizes various pedestrian projects for improvement, identifies and promotes the Complete Streets vision for Hawaii, and meets federal requirements for multimodal planning.

The Economic Benefits of Sustainable Streets (New York City DOT, 2013)

NYCDOT has been a leader in transforming urban streets to improve the environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. But when they tried to evaluate the impact of street design improvements on neighborhood economies, they found no well-established, objective methodologies. Therefore, they set out to develop a new metric. Working with its consultant, DOT evaluated a number of potential measures of local economic vitality and found retail sales – specifically reported sales for street-level retail and restaurant/ food service businesses – to provide the most direct and reliable indicator of the health of local businesses. These results provide convincing evidence that improved accessibility and a more welcoming street environment created by these projects generate increases in retail sales in the project areas.

The Economic Benefits of Sustainable Streets (New York City DOT, 2013)

NYCDOT has been a leader in transforming urban streets to improve the environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. But when they tried to evaluate the impact of street design improvements on neighborhood economies, they found no well-established, objective methodologies. Therefore, they set out to develop a new metric. Working with its consultant, DOT evaluated a number of potential measures of local economic vitality and found retail sales – specifically reported sales for street-level retail and restaurant/ food service businesses – to provide the most direct and reliable indicator of the health of local businesses. These results provide convincing evidence that improved accessibility and a more welcoming street environment created by these projects generate increases in retail sales in the project areas.

Transforming Community (Center for Transportation Studies, 2013)

University of Minnesota researchers are providing an objective analysis of data, public perceptions, and complex impacts resulting from transitway investments in the Twin Cities. This is a 24-page synthesis of their work. The synthesis pulls together findings from the Transitways Impact Research Program studies completed over the past seven years as well as findings from two related projects. It summarizes the actual and projected impacts of transitways on the Twin Cities region, offering lessons learned to help guide the build-out of the rest of the network most effectively. It concludes with a set of implications for policymakers.

Re-thinking the Urban Freeway (SSTI and Mayors Innovation Project, 2013)

Across the country, urban freeways are at the end of their design lives, and cities are wrestling with the question of how to deal with them. Cities have the opportunity to rethink, remove, or repurpose urban freeway space, which can address environmental and social justice harm and result in significant local economic and social benefits. Re-Thinking the Urban Freeway provides cities with best practices and solutions from across the country, to help cities mitigate negative freeway impacts and secure a healthy and more prosperous future.