The Economic Benefits of Sustainable Streets (New York City DOT, 2013)

NYCDOT has been a leader in transforming urban streets to improve the environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. But when they tried to evaluate the impact of street design improvements on neighborhood economies, they found no well-established, objective methodologies. Therefore, they set out to develop a new metric. Working with its consultant, DOT evaluated a number of potential measures of local economic vitality and found retail sales – specifically reported sales for street-level retail and restaurant/ food service businesses – to provide the most direct and reliable indicator of the health of local businesses. These results provide convincing evidence that improved accessibility and a more welcoming street environment created by these projects generate increases in retail sales in the project areas.

The Economic Benefits of Sustainable Streets (New York City DOT, 2013)

NYCDOT has been a leader in transforming urban streets to improve the environment for pedestrians and bicyclists. But when they tried to evaluate the impact of street design improvements on neighborhood economies, they found no well-established, objective methodologies. Therefore, they set out to develop a new metric. Working with its consultant, DOT evaluated a number of potential measures of local economic vitality and found retail sales – specifically reported sales for street-level retail and restaurant/ food service businesses – to provide the most direct and reliable indicator of the health of local businesses. These results provide convincing evidence that improved accessibility and a more welcoming street environment created by these projects generate increases in retail sales in the project areas.

The Bike-share Planning Guide (ITDP, 2013)

Cities around the world are developing bike sharing programs. This guide evaluates international best practice in bike-share, helps to bridge the divide between developing and developed countries’ experiences to provide guidance on planning and implementing a successful bike-share system regardless of the location, size, or density of your city. Amid the droves of information on history, bike share’s benefits, business models, planning, implementation, and best practices, the document answers two important questions. First, what makes a bike share program “world-class”? Second, what programs are “world class”?

Transforming Community (Center for Transportation Studies, 2013)

University of Minnesota researchers are providing an objective analysis of data, public perceptions, and complex impacts resulting from transitway investments in the Twin Cities. This is a 24-page synthesis of their work. The synthesis pulls together findings from the Transitways Impact Research Program studies completed over the past seven years as well as findings from two related projects. It summarizes the actual and projected impacts of transitways on the Twin Cities region, offering lessons learned to help guide the build-out of the rest of the network most effectively. It concludes with a set of implications for policymakers.

Re-thinking the Urban Freeway (SSTI and Mayors Innovation Project, 2013)

Across the country, urban freeways are at the end of their design lives, and cities are wrestling with the question of how to deal with them. Cities have the opportunity to rethink, remove, or repurpose urban freeway space, which can address environmental and social justice harm and result in significant local economic and social benefits. Re-Thinking the Urban Freeway provides cities with best practices and solutions from across the country, to help cities mitigate negative freeway impacts and secure a healthy and more prosperous future.

Re-thinking the Urban Freeway (SSTI and Mayors Innovation Project, 2013)

Across the country, urban freeways are at the end of their design lives, and cities are wrestling with the question of how to deal with them. Cities have the opportunity to rethink, remove, or repurpose urban freeway space, which can address environmental and social justice harm and result in significant local economic and social benefits. Re-Thinking the Urban Freeway provides cities with best practices and solutions from across the country, to help cities mitigate negative freeway impacts and secure a healthy and more prosperous future.

Regional Allocation of Federal Transportation Funds (MZ Strategies, LLC, 2013)

This report is a summary of a research effort undertaken for the MetCouncil in Minneapolis-St Paul to identify processes and criteria used by peer MPOs to allocate their federal Surface Transportation, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement, Program, and Transportation Alternatives Program funds. Six peer MPOs were interviewed and researched, and this research included including the extent to which federal highway funds are blended, how preservation and maintenance needs (particularly for transit) are met, and what type of alignment exists between selection criteria and regional policies or goals.

Maintaining Diversity In America’s Transit-Rich Neighborhoods: Tools for Equitable Neighborhood Change (Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy, 2013)

As communities across the country plan for and build transit-rich neighborhoods there is a growing need for planning and policy tools to guide this effort. This report provides a detailed analysis of how the introduction of high quality transit can spark neighborhood change, positive and negative. This change may have the unintended consequences of displacing existing residents or not meeting transit ridership goals. The report introduces an on-line tool kit to help planners and policy makers address these and other concerns.

America’s Rails with Trails: A Resource for Planners, Agencies, and Advocates on Trails Along Active Railroad Corridors (Rails to Trails Conservancy, 2013)

Instead of converting former rail lines to multi-use trails, states and municipalities are also finding that trails can be built alongside active rail lines. This report examines the characteristics of 88 rails-with-trails in 33 states, based on a survey of trail managers and the results of ongoing study over the past 20 years.

Costs for Pedestrian and Bicyclist Infrastructure Improvements: A Resource for Researchers, Engineers, Planners, and the General Public (Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center, 2013)

This report provides infrastructure cost estimates for pedestrian and bicycle treatments, infrastructure, and amenities from across the country. Costs vary widely, but the report includes high, low, and median costs from a variety of sources.