The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice (SSTI & SGA, 2015)

SSTI and Smart Growth America continue working with state departments of transportation and tracking innovative strategies for meeting 21st century transportation needs. The 2015 edition of The Innovative DOT builds upon its predecessor with updated content and fresh new ideas from a growing number of states.

Accessibility in Cities: Transport and Urban Form (Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, 2014)

This paper focuses on one central aspect of urban development: transport and urban form and how the two shape the provision of access to people, goods and services, and information in cities. The more efficient this access, the greater the economic benefits through economies of scale, agglomeration effects and networking advantages.

2014 AASHTO Social Media Survey​​ (AASHTO, 2014)

For five years AASHTO has conducted a survey of the use of social media and mobile app tools by state DOTs. They asked DOT communication teams about their social media programs, including the types of tools being used, social media measurement, staffing, agency policies and the development of mobile smartphone apps. The 2014 survey reveals a continuing trend toward increasing social media adoption. In addition, the survey suggests that the use of social media tools has dramatically shifted state transportation department communication staffing responsibilities and overall public engagement strategies.​

Public Bikesharing in North America During a Period of Rapid Expansion: Understanding Business Models, Industry Trends, and User Impacts (Mineta Transportation Institute, 2014)

This study evaluates public bikesharing in North America, reviewing the change in travel behavior exhibited by members of different programs in the context of their business models and operational environment. This research, featuers interviews with IT-based bikesharing organizations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, as well as both annual members and casual users of the bikesharing systems.

Access Across America: Transit 2014

Researchers at the University of Minnesota released a new report ranking major metropolitan areas in terms of their accessibility to jobs by transit. The report complements the group’s 2013 release, which measured job accessibility by automobile, and builds upon their ongoing efforts to develop tools for assessing transportation performance in terms other than mobility and congestion. Rankings were determined by a weighted average of accessibility, giving a higher weight to closer jobs. The calculations include all components of a transit journey, including “last mile” access and egress walking segments and transfers.

Model Long Range Transportation Plans: A Guide for Incorporating Performance-Based Planning (Federal Highway Administration, 2014)

This Guidebook informs State departments of transportation, metropolitan planning organizations, and regional transportation planning organizations, as well as their planning partners such as transit agencies, local governments, and Federal agencies, about effective practices for incorporating performance-based planning into the development of a long range transportation plan.

Who’s on Board: The 2014 Mobility Attitudes Survey (Transit Center and RSG, 2014)

This study reveals that Americans from regions across the country think about and use public transit in remarkably similar ways. The report is the first to compare rider and non-rider attitudes by age, income, education, family status and ethnicity, and to examine both cities and suburban areas across various regions of the U.S. The work documents the unmet need for reliable, quality transit. This preference is true across age groups and geographic regions.

Making Effective Fixed-Guideway Transit Investments: Indicators of Success (Transportation Research Board, 2014)

Fixed-guideway transit projects, such as urban rail and bus rapid transit (BRT) lines, are among the largest infrastructure investments that cities and metropolitan areas make. This research report includes a handbook and links to a spreadsheet tool to assist in predicting the likelihood of project success based on the conditions in a potential transit corridor and the metropolitan area. For this research, success measures were defined based on project ridership and the change in transit system usage. A set of indicators was identified that are strongly related to these measures based on an intensive data collection and statistical analysis process.