Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S. (National Institute for Transportation and Communities, 2014)

This report presents finding from research evaluating U.S. protected bicycle lanes (cycle tracks) in terms of their use, perception, benefits, and impacts. Behavior of bicyclists, motorists, and pedestrians was assessed to determine how well each users understands the facility and to identify potential conflicts. Residents and bicyclists indicated that any type of buffer shows a considerable increase in self-reported comfort levels over a striped bike lane, and support for protected bike lanes was high among all users.

Statewide Transportation Planning for Healthy Communities (Volpe Center, 2014)

This report, the second in a series from FHWA, presents insights and a flexible model for state DOTs that choose to integrate public health considerations into their transportation planning and decision-making. It draws from five case studies of innovative DOTs and their partners, and builds on the project team’s previous white paper.

Partnership Financing: Improving Transportation Infrastructure Through Public Private Partnerships (Eno Center for Transportation, 2014)

Eno’s P3 working group brought together industry leaders and experts to identify barriers to the increased use of P3s and to outline approaches for overcoming these barriers. This report identifies patterns in the challenges that localities have faced when using P3s and presents recommendations for federal, state, and local policy to enable greater use of P3s as an infrastructure delivery mechanism in the future.

A Performance-Based Approach to Addressing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Transportation Planning (FHWA, 2014)

This publication is a handbook designed to be a resource for State DOTs and MPOs engaged in performance-based planning and programming to integrate greenhouse gas performance measures into transportation decisionmaking. It discusses key approaches for integrating GHG emissions into a PBPP approach, considerations for selecting an appropriate GHG performance measure, and using GHG performance measures to support investment choices and to enhance decisionmaking.

Has motorization in the U.S. peaked? Part 5: Update through 2012 (Michael Sivak, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, 2014)

Following on previous reports, this report updates driving and fule consumption trends through 2012. The author examines 11 trends in all, including less driving per capita, per licensed driver, per household, and total VMT. Fuel consumption has also declined, and is now lower than the rates in 1984. The main finding of the series of reports is that the respective rates all reached their maxima around 2004. The author argues that, because the onsets of the reductions in these rates preceded the onset of the recession (in 2008), the reductions in these rates likely reflect fundamental, non-economic changes in society. Therefore, these maxima have a reasonable chance of being long-term peaks as well. The present report provides a brief update on these measures through 2012.

Repair Priorities 2014 (Smart Growth America and Taxpayers for Common Sense, 2014)

How much would your state need to repair its roads? Most likely the answer to that question is “a lot.” In some cases, state DOTs could spend their entire annual budget on repair and maintenance and still have work left to do. So why are many states making the problem even worse by continuing to spend scarce transportation dollars expanding their road networks? This report, and update of the Repair Priorities 2011, includes ideas for how DOT officials as well as state and federal policymakers can prioritize repair spending, and help drivers and taxpayers at the same time.