The Future of Transportation Infrastructure Investments: Determining Best Practices for States’ Funding and Financing Mechanisms (Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy – College of William & Mary, 2014)

As revenues from gas taxes diminish the role of federal funding in infrastructure investments, states are searching for both new options and best practices for financing and funding. This report was prepared for the Associated Equipment Distributors and examines various financing and funding options that states can implement. It also makes recommendations for best practices for project selection, partnerships with private entities, and diversification of funding mechanisms.

VMT Inflection Point: Factors Affecting 21st Century Travel (SSTI, 2013)

For many decades, transportation planning has assumed continued increases in automobile use. Now, in a major reversal, the average American is driving considerably less. No one can predict the future with certainty, but there are many reasons to think that VMT trends will not revert to the 20th century trend. This paper lists some of those reasons, with references to supporting literature.

Road Usage Charge Pilot Program Preliminary Findings (Oregon DOT, 2013)

The objective of the Road Usage Charge Pilot Program is to demonstrate several choices for measuring and paying a road usage charge that are easy for motorists to perform while maintaining an efficient collection system administered by multiple interoperable providers, including ODOT and private sector entities.

Report on Impacts of Road Usage Charges in Rural, Urban and Mixed Counties (Oregon DOT, 2013)

This report represents the study of impacts of road usage charges in rural, urban, and mixed counties in Oregon. Despite perceptions that a road usage charge is unfair to rural residents, the data collected and analyzed for this study reveal that rural residents, on average, will not be affected in any significant way by a road usage charge—financially, behaviorally, or technologically.

Contemporary Approaches to Parking Pricing: A Primer (FHWA, 2012)

Today, technological advances offer the opportunity to effectively manage and price parking. This primer discusses advances covering a broad array of parking pricing applications, available technology, preferred user accommodations, and strategies for gaining public acceptance for policy changes.

Contemporary Approaches to Parking Pricing: A Primer (FHWA, 2012)

Today, technological advances offer the opportunity to effectively manage and price parking. This primer discusses advances covering a broad array of parking pricing applications, available technology, preferred user accommodations, and strategies for gaining public acceptance for policy changes.

Contemporary Approaches to Parking Pricing: A Primer (FHWA, 2012)

Today, technological advances offer the opportunity to effectively manage and price parking. This primer discusses advances covering a broad array of parking pricing applications, available technology, preferred user accommodations, and strategies for gaining public acceptance for policy changes.

Mileage-Based User Fee Winners and Losers An Analysis of the Distributional Implications of Taxing Vehicle Miles Traveled, With Projections, 2010–2030 (Rand Corporation, 2012)

Equity is a commonly raised public acceptance concern regarding MBUFs. The research finds that a flat-rate MBUF would be no more or less regressive than fuel taxes, now or in the future. The findings are significant because they suggest that equity considerations based on ability to pay will not be a significant reason to oppose or support the adoption of MBUFs. Further, it is possible to structure an MBUF that provides incentives for fuel efficiency while maintaining other favorable qualities of MBUFs such as their economic efficiency and fiscal sustainability.

The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice (SSTI & SGA, 2012)

State officials across the country are facing the same challenges. Revenues are falling and budgets are shrinking while transportation demands grow. Most state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) have ambitious goals: improve safety, reduce congestion, enhance economic opportunity, improve reliability, preserve system assets, accelerate project delivery, and help to create healthier, more livable neighborhoods, just to name a few.
The handbook provides 31 recommendations transportation officials can use as they position their agencies for success in the new economy. The handbook documents many of the innovative approaches state leaders are using to make systems more efficient, government more effective and constituents better satisfied.