Florida’s freight infrastructure investment named an innovation to watch

Florida’s statewide approach to freight infrastructure investments has been highlighted in the Brookings-Rockefeller Project on State and Metropolitan Innovation’s Top 10 State and Metropolitan Innovations to Watch. Florida’s strategy is unique in that it aligns infrastructure systems across the state, thus allowing the FLP to consider the entire state’s freight interests rather than just those of individual ports and intermodal centers.

New York City’s subway train operators taking unilateral action to prevent fatalities at stations

Following two widely publicized incidents of waiting passengers being pushed into the path of oncoming subway trains, the Transit Workers Union has directed its subway train operators to slow trains to 10 mph when entering station areas to enable them to stop if riders are on the tracks. This and other solutions to accidental and intentional falls onto tracks are being examined in New York and cities around the world.

Interactive map shows the cost of river lock failures

A new interactive map shows the importance of key locks on the Ohio, Mississippi, and Illinois Rivers and outlines possible economic shocks all across the country should one or more of them fail. Failures in this system affect not just the states that border these rivers, but many areas that receive goods – in particular corn, soybeans, coal, and petroleum products – from those states

Bike boxes and lanes may increase “right hook” crashes in some circumstances

A preliminary analysis of bike crashes at intersections in Portland with painted bike lanes, bike boxes, and bicycle-related signage has indicated that when placed on a downhill section of road, they may actually increase the number of bicycle/motor-vehicle crashes, especially during “stale” green lights.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities: Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes (TRB, 2012)

This report is an update to a series from TRB examining how travelers respond to different types of transportation infrastructure, facilities, and policies. This chapter examines pedestrian and bicyclist behavior and travel demand outcomes in a relatively broad sense. It focuses on the travel behavior and public health implications of facilities such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and on-transit accommodation of bicycles, street-crossing treatments, bicycle parking, and showers. Discussion of the implications of pedestrian and bicycle “friendly” neighborhoods, policies, programs, and promotion is also incorporated.

Making the Case for Transportation Investment and Revenue (AASHTO and Parsons Brinckerhoff, 2009)

Many states are looking for ways to ask for additional transportation funding to maintain crumbling infrastructure and meet current demand. This study of successful campaigns recommends how to craft a request for funding. Case studies and elements to examine before the request are included.

Community Design and the Incidence of Crashes Involving Pedestrians and Motorists Aged 75 and Older (Texas Transportation Institute, 2012)

Community design and transportation infrastructure can be problematic for both younger and older community residents. This study examines how community design specifically affects drivers and pedestrians aged 75 and older.