NYPD language change signals increased emphasis on traffic safety

The New York Police Department has only recently started using the term “collision” instead of “accident.” The new terminology is part of an increased emphasis on investigating crashes that are not life-threatening. New York’s Traffic Commissioner has been praised for her emphasis on improving bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, however advocates are not as pleased with a crackdown on traffic infractions by bicyclists.

Cities feel left out of transportation discussion

At the first national conference of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), city transportation and elected officials expressed dismay that cities may be on their own in moving forward with innovative plans and policies. Attendees were frsutrated that neither cities nor transportation overall got much attention during the recent campaign season.

Climate impacts on transportation a hot topic during a hot summer

Amid this summer’s wildfires, drought and heat wave, many news articles and scholarly reports have focused on the changing climate’s effects on transportation. Reports include New York City’s subway leaking, buckling roads in Wisconsin, permafrost melting in Alaska, and predicted sea level rises along the East Coast. According to a new report from TRB, DOTs may have to adapt to new climate patterns.

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.