The psychology of daily versus monthly parking fees

Several major employers in Seattle are trying innovative ways to charge for commuter parking. These employers found that how parking for commuters is priced—on a daily vs. a monthly basis—makes a big difference in their employees’ commuting habits. By allowing their employees the flexibility to choose their commute mode on a day-to-day basis, these companies show sustained decreases in the number of employees commuting alone to work in their cars.

The psychology of daily versus monthly parking fees

Several major employers in Seattle are trying innovative ways to charge for commuter parking. These employers found that how parking for commuters is priced—on a daily vs. a monthly basis—makes a big difference in their employees’ commuting habits. By allowing their employees the flexibility to choose their commute mode on a day-to-day basis, these companies show sustained decreases in the number of employees commuting alone to work in their cars.

How much does parking really cost (in time, fuel, and frustration)?

INRIX, a company that provides both software and data services in the realm of transportation and mobility, has issued a report on the cost of “parking pain.” Instead of focusing on the cost of a parking spot, the report looks at the time, wasted fuel, and congestion caused by searching for a spot. They also estimated how much drivers waste by paying for more parking time than they need.

Completing the commute: Does Uber have a role in parking management?

The rapid rise of Transit Network Companies like Uber and Lyft has sparked a new round of innovations in transportation. While most early TNC success has been in large urban areas, the usefulness of these services for bridging first- and last-mile connections between home, work, and transit outside major urban centers is becoming apparent. A new pilot program in Summit, NJ, a bedroom community to New York City, illustrates an unexpected and important benefit of targeted use of TNCs: parking management.

TDM study suggests we are overestimating vehicle trip generation rates

In a recent study done in Melbourne, Australia, researchers compared transportation demand management plans at four new residential developments with control sites with similar characteristics. The results showed lower car mode share and trip generation in the sites with TDM plans, but also significantly lower rates of vehicle trip generation than those published in commonly-used sources.

Parking drastically oversupplied across the country

On average, the amount of parking provided at mixed-use centers is 65 percent higher than necessary, according to a study just published in the Transportation Research Record. That finding challenges the perceived need for additional parking in many of those places. Meanwhile, the unused parking spaces take up valuable space, add to construction and maintenance costs, and undermine efforts to manage travel demand.

Expanded transit tax incentive can’t compete with the lure of subsidized parking

Many municipalities and the federal government have goals of improving air quality, reducing traffic congestion, and increasing transit use. However, until recently federal policies providing greater tax breaks to car commuters than transit commuters have thwarted these goals. However, recent equivalency in financial incentives does not fully counterbalance the attraction of driving alone to work.

Effects of Parking Provision on Automobile Use in Cities: Inferring Causality (McCahill, Garrick, Atkinson-Palombo and Polinski, 2015)

Automobile use has been on the rise in cities for nearly a century and so has the supply of parking. Because driving often seems unavoidable, policymakers, developers and the public push endlessly for more parking to meet demand. That push, however, might only be making matters worse. SSTI Senior Associate Chris McCahill’s research suggests that abundant parking in cities causes people to drive more, shedding important light on the question of cause and effect.

Parking increases citywide car use, SSTI researcher finds

Automobile use has been on the rise in cities for nearly a century and so has the supply of parking. Because driving often seems unavoidable, policymakers, developers and the public push endlessly for more parking to meet demand. That push, however, might only be making matters worse. SSTI Senior Associate Chris McCahill’s research suggests that abundant parking in cities causes people to drive more, shedding important light on the question of cause and effect.

How a Chicago suburb became car-lite and lessons for other communities

In a provocatively titled article—The Suburb That Tried to Kill the Car—Politico digs into how the Chicago suburb of Evanston reinvented itself through transit-oriented development. It is a tale with lessons for many other communities about the interplay and delicate balance of land use, transportation options, parking, zoning, tax revenues, affordable housing, and attracting new development.