Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.

Faulty suburban parking assumptions not holding up at new East Harlem mall

A wild overestimation of parking demand at a mall in Manhattan has led to wasted space, reduced pedestrian accessibility, and undermining long term planning goals. Because no big box stores had been built in such a dense urban area, developers relied on data from similar developments in more suburban locations. Assuming 67 to 68 percent of shoppers would arrive by car, the mall built vastly more parking than was needed to accommodate customers.

Land Use and Transportation Scenario Analysis and Microsimulation (LUTSAM) Tool (SSTI and DelDOT, 2012)

With SSTI assistance, Delaware DOT has developed its four-step demand model for scenario planning, using off-the-shelf GIS and simulation software. The tool, called Land Use and Transportation Scenario Analysis and Microsimulation (LUTSAM), enables DelDOT to quickly model and display development scenarios, providing communities and developers with analysis on traffic, congestion, emissions and other outcomes. LUTSAM will dramatically demonstrate, in real-world cases, the cost and environmental advantages of well-connected, compact and mixed use development. It is currently being used in a variety of settings around the state. Because it is built around standard software, it is adaptable for other states, MPOs and cities seeking to improve their land use and transportation planning.

Community Design and the Incidence of Crashes Involving Pedestrians and Motorists Aged 75 and Older (Texas Transportation Institute, 2012)

Community design and transportation infrastructure can be problematic for both younger and older community residents. This study examines how community design specifically affects drivers and pedestrians aged 75 and older.

Why “forgiving roadways” are not the solution in urban areas

Roadway designers since the 1960’s have used the concept of “forgiving highways.” Due to its success in reducing fatal crashes on high speed access controlled roadways, engineers have been applying this methodology to urban streets in built up areas as well. However, this approach might actually make certain roads deadlier for motorists, as it encourages drivers to drive faster and less cautiously, and it has been shown to lessen pedestrian and bicyclist safety.

Bicycling and Walking in the U.S.: 2012 Benchmarking Report (Alliance for Biking and Walking, 2012)

This 3rd biennial benchmarking report looks at data and policies in all 50 states and the 51 largest US cities to examine how they stack up for walking and biking. This is a useful tool for local and state officials that would like to improve conditions and safety for bicyclists and pedestrians, or to promote non-motorized transportation.