Getting the Goods Without the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts (SSTI, 2013)

This project, funded by SSTI with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE), identifies and evaluates strategies to reduce the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas by managing freight transportation demand.

Regional TDM Action Plan (Pugest Sound Regional Council, 2013)

This transportation demand management plan from the Puget Sound Regional Council and the TDM Steering Committee lays out strategies to reduce single occupancy car trips through the region. A variety of efforts are outlined, including neighborhood-based alternative transportation education, car-sharing, employer-based ride-sharing, parking management, and regional transit cooperation.

Regional TDM Action Plan (Pugest Sound Regional Council, 2013)

This transportation demand management plan from the Puget Sound Regional Council and the TDM Steering Committee lays out strategies to reduce single occupancy car trips through the region. A variety of efforts are outlined, including neighborhood-based alternative transportation education, car-sharing, employer-based ride-sharing, parking management, and regional transit cooperation.

MassDOT seeks to triple transit, bike and walk share

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation last week announced a goal of tripling the share of trips in the state taken by transit, bike, and walking by 2030. Strategies to achieve the growth in non-single-occupant-vehicle modes are still being considered. If MassDOT can show progress toward its ambitious goals, it could provide best practices for peer agencies pursuing related policy ends.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities: Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes (TRB, 2012)

This report is an update to a series from TRB examining how travelers respond to different types of transportation infrastructure, facilities, and policies. This chapter examines pedestrian and bicyclist behavior and travel demand outcomes in a relatively broad sense. It focuses on the travel behavior and public health implications of facilities such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and on-transit accommodation of bicycles, street-crossing treatments, bicycle parking, and showers. Discussion of the implications of pedestrian and bicycle “friendly” neighborhoods, policies, programs, and promotion is also incorporated.