Ride-hailing services disrupting ambulances and airports

New reports have indicated unanticipated disruptions caused by ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft. Previously, SSTI discussed the positive and negative impacts ride-hailing services have on our transportation systems. Although these new reports focus on changes to ambulance services and airport revenues, they highlight again that ride-hailing services are fundamentally changing our transportation systems.

What is ride-hailing doing to our transportation system?

A new study from the Institute of Transportation Studies at University of California–Davis delves into the effects of ride-hailing (Uber and Lyft) use on other parts of our transportation system. What they find confirms some assumptions and disproves others. Interrelationships between parking, vehicle ownership, use of different forms of transit, and effect on vehicle miles traveled are all examined. The reasons respondents gave for using ride-hailing services may also impact transportation policy decisions.

Offsetting loss of public transit revenue due to ride-hailing services

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is proposing an increase in the city’s fee charged to ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft to offset the loss of revenue from public transit users who switched to ride-hailing services. This additional revenue, to be used specifically for mass transit, will add to the $59.6 million generated in 2016 as a result of the fee.

Offsetting loss of public transit revenue due to ride-hailing services

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is proposing an increase in the city’s fee charged to ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft to offset the loss of revenue from public transit users who switched to ride-hailing services. This additional revenue, to be used specifically for mass transit, will add to the $59.6 million generated in 2016 as a result of the fee.

Traffic enforcement observations target Uber and Lyft drivers as largest offenders

A recent scan from San Francisco’s Police Department found that Uber and Lyft drivers were responsible for nearly 65 percent of traffic infractions in bike- and transit-only lanes. The overwhelming majority of these tickets, for all vehicles and for Uber and Lyft vehicles, cited San Francisco Code 7.2.72 TC (see below), “Driving in a Transit Lane,” which comes with a $69 fine. There were also three felony and 29 misdemeanor arrests associated with this traffic report, indicating more serious incidents.

Colorado city teams with Uber app to summon on-demand transit

In a first-of-its-kind partnership in the U.S., a city has partnered with Uber to use existing transit vehicles to provide on-demand service. Resident of Lone Tree, Colorado, can now use the Uber app to request a 12-passenger vehicle and driver provided by the city’s Link service. Other riders may be picked up along the way. The ride is free through the end of December anywhere in the city. The genesis of the partnership with Uber came about through the Smart Cities Collaborative, a collaboration of Transportation for America and Sidewalk Labs.

Transit futures in an Uber world

Bus ridership in Philadelphia is down according to a recent article on Philly.com. This decline is correlated with the rise of Uber and other ridesharing apps in the city that provide some riders with an alternative to taking the bus. Transit agencies around the country are struggling with the Uber effect, where some riders are turning away from buses and using transportation network companies instead.

New transit models: Laguna Beach and Uber partner for senior transportation services

Starting in mid-June, Laguna Beach, CA, will partner with Uber in a pilot program to provide transportation options for residents aged 55 and older, a group that makes up about 50 percent of the city’s population. To fill the transportation gap caused by cuts in the frequency and coverage of transit service in the city, the pilot will provide free rides for two months and low-cost rides after the pilot. This program, a first of its kind, will be an interesting test of a new application of ride-hailing services.

A preview of the driverless-vehicle future: Uber and other TNCs are cannibalizing New York’s transit ridership and worsening congestion and emissions

The effect of transportation network companies is one of the central concerns of transportation planning, in part because TNCs can provide a hint about what might happen when driverless vehicles become widely available. In addition, to date the lack of TNCs’ willingness to share data has limited our ability to assess these effects. A new report focusing on these services in New York City, sheds welcome new light on the topic, and provides plenty of evidence for pessimism about the sustainability of TNCs, conventional or driverless, without significant policy intervention.